Businessman angry at ticket for parking in his own entry

Superglaze, Portadown.  Lee Collins who got a parking ticket for parking his van in front of his own business premises.  INPT0215-405
Superglaze, Portadown. Lee Collins who got a parking ticket for parking his van in front of his own business premises. INPT0215-405

A business owner who was given a ticket after parking part way into his own entry said wardens are crippling Portadown.

Lee Collins, who owns Superglaze in Meadow Lane, said he was “fuming” when he found the ticket on his van just after 9.40 on Monday morning.

It is the second time in just a few months that he has been fined for parking outside his premises.

On this occasion, Mr Collins was issued with the ticket for ‘parking in a restricted street during prescribed hours’. He had come into the office around 9.15 to pick up some paperwork before going on to a meeting,

He said, “I walked outside and there were two wardens. I was not blocking anyone. When I am not loading, I park in the entry but I just put the nose in because I need room to walk around with the glass. It is a tight fit when the whole van is in.

“The wardens tell me I have to be right in the driveway but that doesn’t give me space to carry the glass from the racks in the alley into the shop. It is absolutely disgraceful. They are crippling the town. it is no wonder people drive out to the shopping centre.”

Mr Collins has owned the business for the past 14 years and employs another full-time worker.

It has been based at the Meadow Lane site for nearly 28 years.

He added, “I need to have the van close to the premises because I can’t carry glass far or close to members of the public as it’s too dangerous. If a gust of wind were to catch it, it could shatter.

“This is a big corner with lots of space. We have 40ft lorries parked here and even they don’t block or obstruct the view.”

The previous ticket was also for parking outside the front of the shop and although Mr Collins appealed, it was unsuccessful.

A TransportNI spokesperson said, “The vehicle in question was parked wholly on a footway adjacent to the carriageway with a single yellow line where parking is not permitted. This type of restriction applies equally to carriageway and footway.

“For commercial vehicles such as this, a 10 minute observation period is applied to establish if any activity is taking place. Our records show that a full 10 minutes was applied in this case. However, there was no activity observed, resulting in a Parking Charge Notice (PCN) being issued.

“Any driver may challenge a PCN directly with the department if they feel it was incorrectly issued.”