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Food men fast at Christmas

Christmas fast approaching& But for Angus Wilson and Neville Woods, it literally means a fast as they are not eating a bite  not even of a plumpious turkey  on the big day. And they are hoping their charity hunger will see the money coming in fast for Fields of Life. Knoxs of West Street provided the bird - for photographic purposes!

Christmas fast approaching& But for Angus Wilson and Neville Woods, it literally means a fast as they are not eating a bite  not even of a plumpious turkey  on the big day. And they are hoping their charity hunger will see the money coming in fast for Fields of Life. Knoxs of West Street provided the bird - for photographic purposes!

Neville Woods and Angus Wilson are food experts – Neville in the home bakery and supermarket trade and Angus in the potato trade in ‘Wilson’s Country’.

So it won’t be easy for them when they don’t eat a bite on Christmas Day and watch their family tuck into the turkey, plum pudding and all the trimmings.

It’s not that they’re slimming. They’re doing it all for charity to help feed, clothe and educate the children of the world’s newest (and perhaps most impoverished) country South Sudan.

Neville’s main thrust is to provide water-drilling equipment in South Sudan, formed in 2011 after 50 years of civil war with the north. It’s the second year running that he has skipped his Christmas dinner – he won’t eat a bite for 24 hours, having just returned from a fact-finding tour with local charity Fields of Life.

And he will be joined in his Christmas Day fast by Angus, Fields of Life Director, who originally went to Uganda with a team of nine (including Neville) visiting various Fields of Life projects and witnessing the challenges and poverty of the people of East Africa face on a daily basis.

Neville says, “In Uganda, we saw the need for fresh drinking water. We watched women washing clothes in rivers and ponds and children drinking the same water. One child in five dies from dirty water related illness. By raising funds to drill wells we can save the lives of thousands of children.”

They then turned their attention to South Sudan, where Field of Life if also providing primary education for children who are often taught under mango trees, and where just one per cent of girls finish primary education.

Said Neville, “We need to raise lots of funds for the project, and giving up Christmas dinner is nothing compared with what these people have to endure – dirty water, sparse food and little education.”

For more information, visit the Field of Life website or phone Field of Life at Carn Industrial Estate on 02838 390395.

 

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