Nigel’s story of dad’s murder to feature in film

Nigel Lutton at the premiere of 'Strong to Survive' at Belfast's Strand Cinema. Photo by Graham Curry
Nigel Lutton at the premiere of 'Strong to Survive' at Belfast's Strand Cinema. Photo by Graham Curry

A Portadown undertaker whose father was murdered by the IRA during the Troubles tells his personal story in a new Orange Order film on the impact of terrorism.

Nigel Lutton’s father Frederick was shot dead by the IRA as he locked the gates of the National Trust’s Argory House near Moy on May 1, 1979.

The Annaghmore man, a father-of-two, was a former RUC reservist.

The Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland launched a new film documenting the impact of terrorism on the Institution and on the families of individual members.

‘Strong to Survive’ features the personal stories of a number of those directly affected by some of the most heinous attacks associated with the Troubles.

The powerful and emotive short film, illustrating the human cost of republican terrorism and the quiet resolve of victims, premiered to an invited audience at Belfast’s Strand Cinema last week.

Speaking in the film, Mr Lutton praises the influence of the Orange Institution in the aftermath of his father’s murder.

He said, “As I became a teen and the killings intensified, there was always the temptation for revenge, but the Orange Order, thank goodness, saw with a lot of people in my position the danger signs. They made sure there was an alternative outlet to revenge, they made sure young people didn’t go to paramilitaries. The Orange Order was a great focus for its historical and cultural aspects.”

Among those to feature in the production are survivors of the Tullyvallen massacre, who recount the horror when IRA gunmen stormed into the rural Orange hall during a lodge meeting, and murdered four Orangemen.