Trust campaign to look after its staff

Director of Older People and Primary Care for the Southern Trust Angela McVeigh, Dr Gerry Millar GP Facilitator in Cancer and Palliative Care and Bereavement Co-ordinator Anne Coyle are encouraging staff to look after their own wellbeing.

Director of Older People and Primary Care for the Southern Trust Angela McVeigh, Dr Gerry Millar GP Facilitator in Cancer and Palliative Care and Bereavement Co-ordinator Anne Coyle are encouraging staff to look after their own wellbeing.

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The Southern Health and Social Care Trust has launched a campaign to help staff look after their own wellbeing, particularly when working in emotional situations.

Bereavement co-ordinator for the Southern Trust Anne Coyle explains, “Taking Care of U has been developed to help health and social care staff find strategies to cope, particularly following the death of a patient or client or when supporting people who have been bereaved.

Developed by the trust’s bereavement forum, the publication suggests strategies to deal with such situations, raises awareness of the policies in place to support staff, and signposts them to other useful information and advice.

Director of Older People and Primary Care for the Southern Trust Angela McVeigh said, “In the Southern Trust we have thousands of staff caring for patients, clients and their families through what can often be very stressful circumstances.

“Whilst they are trained to deliver end of life care with compassion, dealing with death, grief and bereavement can have an emotional impact on health care workers. So whether it is a community district nurse - nursing a patient through a long illness in their own home, or hospital medics dealing with acute traumatic emergencies, we want to help all of our staff to take care of themselves.”

Primary Care colleagues can also avail of the resource as Dr Gerry Millar GP facilitator in Cancer and Palliative Care for the trust adds, “All of our staff should be admired for being able to carry out their duties so professionally even when faced with sadness and stressful circumstances. Knowing the patient so well can make end of life care even more difficult for Primary Care staff and can sometimes even feel like the loss of a family member. We hope this guidance helps staff involved in such emotionally charged situations to cope .”

with the demands of a job which is so greatly valued.”