Video - Solar eclipse viewed in Portadown

People across the Portadown area got a glimpse of a rare eclipse of the sun this morning.

The amount of cloud cover determined whether people got a clear view of the event.

A beautiful picture of the solar eclipse taken this morning at St Mary's Primary School in Maghery by Mrs Carol Devlin.  All the children were delighted to see the picture.

A beautiful picture of the solar eclipse taken this morning at St Mary's Primary School in Maghery by Mrs Carol Devlin. All the children were delighted to see the picture.

The eclipse was at its fullest at 09.31am and ended at 10.39am.

St Mary’s Primary School at Maghery sent us a stunning image while Corinne McCann stuck a piece of paper on the wall and used a colander and a pinhole through paper to project the image.

Experts warned people not to look directly at the sun because of the risk of it causing serious harm, but there were ways to watch it safely.

For much of the UK, the eclipse revealed itself as an abnormal level of darkness at 9.30am in the morning while the sun remained hidden behind a blanket of cloud.

Corinne McCann's picture of the eclipse.She stuck a piece of paper on the wall and used a colander and a pinhole through paper to project the image.

Corinne McCann's picture of the eclipse.She stuck a piece of paper on the wall and used a colander and a pinhole through paper to project the image.

But there were pockets of clear skies over Wales, parts of the West Country and the Midlands, and eastern Scotland around Edinburgh.

Around the UK, the proportion of the sun covered by the moon increased towards the north, ranging from 84% in London to 89% in Manchester, 93% in Edinburgh and 97% in Lerwick in the Shetland Isles.

Times also varied. In overcast London, the eclipse began at 8.24am, and reached its maximum extent at 9.31am. For observers in Edinburgh, it started at 8.30am and peaked at 9.35 am.

The last solar eclipse of such significance occurred on August 11 1999, and was “total” - with 100% of the Sun covered - when seen from Cornwall.

Another “deep” partial eclipse visible in the UK will not occur until August 12, 2026, and the next total eclipse not until September 2090.