Portadown College students urged to use Fairtrade products

At Portadown College Fairtrade Fortnight event: Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Councils Deputy Lord Mayor, Councillor Paul Greenfield, Waste and Environmental Manager, Lynsey Daly and Recycling Inspector, Emma Shortt join Heydi Janeth Espino Mairena,
Soppexcca Coffee Cooperative Nicaragua, Melanie Drea and Ricarda Stienhans from Fairtrade Ireland, Hannah McInteggart, SRC Student Activities Officer and students David Coulter, MegCunningham and Dmitrus Foross.
At Portadown College Fairtrade Fortnight event: Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Councils Deputy Lord Mayor, Councillor Paul Greenfield, Waste and Environmental Manager, Lynsey Daly and Recycling Inspector, Emma Shortt join Heydi Janeth Espino Mairena, Soppexcca Coffee Cooperative Nicaragua, Melanie Drea and Ricarda Stienhans from Fairtrade Ireland, Hannah McInteggart, SRC Student Activities Officer and students David Coulter, MegCunningham and Dmitrus Foross.

Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council’s Environmental Education Team visited Portadown College as part of Fairtrade Fortnight.

Fairtrade Fortnight, runs from February 27 to March 12, and the Council’s Environmental Education Team have been out talking to over 1,000 young people to encourage them to use Fairtrade products.

‘Don’t Feed Exploitation’ is the theme for this year and is aimed at ensuring the millions of farmers in developing countries are getting paid what they deserve.

During the visit to Portadown College, officers were joined by Heydi Mairena, from the Soppexcca Coffee Co-Operative, Nicaragua, who gave a first-hand account of the impact of Fairtrade on her life and her community.

Fairtrade is making a real difference to the lives of more than 1.65m farmers and workers in 74 developing countries.

“Council is very supportive to the Fairtrade initiative and we are encouraging young people to use their products where possible,” said Lynsey Daly, Waste and Environmental Manager.

“By choosing Fairtrade products we’re saying that no one deserves to be short-changed for a hard day’s work and that it is wrong to benefit from farmers being paid unfairly.

“Millions of hard working farmers in developing countries aren’t paid enough to support their families, yet they provide food that we eat.

“Buying products with the Fairtrade mark, supports farmers as they work to improve their lives. It helps them to get a better deal, which means they can make their own decisions, control their futures.”

To support the initiative, look out for the Fairtrade logo on fruit, vegetables, tea, coffee, sugar, and jewellery.